ESPE Abstracts (2016) 86 P-P2-301

HbA1C and IGF-1 Levels in Diabetic Children Treated with Vitamin D

Elham Hashemi Dehkordia, Vida Hashemi Dehkordib, Saied Mohammad Reza Fatemic & Roya Kelishadid


aDepartment of Pediatric Endocrinology, Child Growth and Development Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; bSchool of Medicine, Islamic Azad University of Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran; cDepartment of Pediatric, Islamic Azad University of Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran; dDepartment of Pediatric, Child Growth and Development Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran


Background: Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) is the most common chronic diseases in children. Studies show that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is higher in this group of patients.

Objective and hypotheses: The aim of this study was evaluation HbA1C and IGF-1 levels in children with T1DM that receiving vitamin D supplement.

Method: A total of 30 diabetic children 5–15 years with 25(OH) D levels lower than 74 nmol/l (29 ng/ml) were selected. Vitamin D supplement were given to patients for 8 weeks. Concentrations of serum 25(OH) D, IGF-1 and HbA1c were compared between baseline and after treatment.

Results: The mean concentrations of serum 25(OH) D and IGF-I were significantly increased from 16.27±6.56 and 245.57±108.9 at baseline to 40.80±1.17 and 264.46±104.30 respectively. The mean concentrations of HbA1c were significantly decreased from 8.89±1.39 to 8.60±1.23 (P=0.047). Serum HbA1c correlated negatively with Serum 25(OH)D (r=−0.40, P=0.05) and IGF1 (r=−0.69, P<0.001).

Conclusion: Treatment with vitamin D improved glycemic control in children with T1DM. This study showed that serum IGF1 related to glucose homeostasis in this patients.

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