ESPE Abstracts (2015) 84 P-3-643

Influence of Birth Weight and Total Body Less Head Bone Mineral Contents in 10-18 Korean Adolescents: Results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2008-2010

Won Kyoung Cho, Yoonji Lee, Moonbae Ahn, Yeon Jin Jeon, In Ah Jung, Shin Hee Kim, So Hyun Park, Min Ho Jung & Byung-Kyu Suh


Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea


Background: In adolescents, as much as 51% of peak bone mass is accumulating and reaching 40% of bone mineral density (BMD) of adults. There are inconsistent reports on the associations between birth weight (BW) and bone mineral contents (BMC) in adolescents.

Objective and hypotheses: We try to investigate the association between BW and BMC in adolescents.

Method: Dual-energy x-ray aborptiometry assessment (DXA) of 10–18 adolescents (males=474, females=394) recorded in the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008–2010 conducted by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare were assessed in this cross-sectional study. The subjects gestational age below 37 weeks and over 42 weeks were excluded. BW, current height, current weight, current BMI and clinical characteristics were compared according to quartiles of BMC and areal BMD of total body less head (TBLH), lumbar spine (LS) and femur neck (FN) according to age and sex.

Results: According to TBLH BMC quartile groups, there were significant differences in BW (P for trend=0.003 in males and <0.0001 in females), current height (P for trend=0.0002 in males and <0.0001 in females), current weight (P for trend<0.0001 in males and <0.0001 in females), and BMI (P for trend=0.003 in males and <0.0001 in females) and there were no significant differences in age, maternal age, and gestational age. According to LS BMC quartile groups, there were significant differences in BW (P for trend=0.034 in males), current height (P for trend=0.0001 in males and <0.0001 in females), current weight (P for trend <0.0001 in males and <0.0001 in females), and BMI (P for trend=0.003 in males and <0.0001 in females) and there were no significant differences in age, maternal age, and gestational age. According to FN BMC quartile groups, there were significant differences in BW (P for trend=0.008 in males and 0.020 in females), current height (P for trend <0.0001 in females), current weight (P for trend<0.0001 in males and <0.0001 in females), and BMI (P for trend<0.0001 in males and <0.0001 in females) and there were no significant differences in age, maternal age, and gestational age. In males, BW showed positive correlations with TBLH BMC (r=0.132, P=0.0247), NK_BMC (r=0.137, P=0.0189), TBLH BMD (r=0.108, P=0.0458) and NK_BMD (r=0.119, P=0.0414). However, BW showed only positive correlation with TBLH BMC (r=0.168, P=0.044) in females. In multivariate analyses, the odds ratio of having highest quartile TBLH BMC (OR=2.157, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.362–3.415) and highest quartile FN BMC (OR=2.467, 95% CI, 1.183–5.144) in males and highest quartile TBLH BMC(OR=1.985, 95% CI, 1.125–3.503) in females according to BW were significantly increased after adjusting for age, BMI, smoke, drink, exercise and gestational age.

Conclusion: TBLH BMC is positively related to BW in Korean adolescents.