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55th Annual ESPE

Paris, France
10 Sep 2016 - 12 Sep 2016

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Paris, France: 10-12 September 2016 Further information

Rapid Free Communications

Syndromes: Mechanisms and Management

RAB3IP and DGCR8 as a Potentially Pathogenic Novel Candidate Gene Involving in Growth Disorders
aUnidade de Endocrinologia Genetica (LIM25), Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; bUnidade de Endocrinologia do Desenvolvimento, Laboratorio de Hormonios e Genetica Molecular (LIM42), Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil; cDepartment of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; dCentro de Pesquisa sobre o Genoma Humano e Células-Tronco, Instituto de Biociências da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil
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Effect of Very Early Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment on Long-term Growth in Girls with Turner Syndrome (TS): A Multicenter, Open-Label, Extension Study
aUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; bSeattle Children’s Hospital, Washington, USA; cThomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; dRiley Hospital for Children, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; eLilly USA, LLC, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
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Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment in Skeletal Dysplasias - Short-term Results in Prepubertal Children Reported in KIGS
aPediatric Endocrinology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; bPfizer Health AB, Sollentuna, Sweden; cPfizer Inc., Endocrine Care, New York, USA, 4University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium
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Abnormal Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies (VFSS) in Infants with Prader-Willi Syndrome Indicate a High Rate of Silent Aspiration
aSeattle Children’s Hospital, Division of Endocrine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; bSeattle Children’s Hospital, Division of Genetic Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; cSeattle Children’s Hospital, Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; dSeattle Children’s Hospital, Division of Psychiatry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; eSeattle Children’s Hospital, Division of Developmental Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
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Growth Hormone (GH) Deficiency Type II: Clinical and Molecular Evidence of Impaired Regulated GH Secretion Due to an Gln181Arg GH-1 Gene Mutation
aUniversity Children’s Hospital, Bern, Switzerland; bHospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo FMUSP, São Paulo, Brazil; cCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
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Characteristics of Responders and Poor-responders to Increlex® Therapy - Data from Children Enrolled in the European Increlex® Growth Forum Database (EU-IGFD)
aDepartment of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; bPaediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology and Diabetology, Centre de référence des maladies endocriniennes rares de la croissance, Hôpital Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Des, Paris, France; cPaediatric Endocrinology Division, Children’s Hospital, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; dIpsen, Boulogne-Billancourt, France
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The Actual Incidence of Small for Gestational Age (SGA) Newborns and their Catch-up Growth is Dramatically Lower than Previously Considered
aDivision of Pediatric Endocrinology, Hadassah, Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; bDepartment of Neonatology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; cJerusalem District Health Office, Ministry of Health, The Hebrew University, Hadassah, Jerusalem, Israel
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