ESPE Abstracts (2014) 82 P-D-3-1-901

Music Benefits on Postoperative Distress and Pain in Pediatric Day Care Surgery

Valeria Calcaterraa, Daniela Larizzaa, Ghassan Nakibb, Selene Ostunib, Irene Bonomellia, Simonetta Mencherinic, Elisa Zambaitib, Savina Mannarinoa, Riccardo Albertinid, Carmine Tinellie & Gloria Pelizzob


aPediatric Unit, Department of the Mother and Child Health, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy; bPediatric Surgery Unit, Department of the Mother and Child Health, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy; cDepartment of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy; dLaboratory of Clinical Chemistry, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy; cBiometry & Clinical Epidemiology, Scientific Direction, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy


Background: Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age.

Objective and hypotheses: The purpose of this study is to better understand the benefits of music on postoperative distress and pain in Pediatric Day Care Surgery.

Methods: Forty-two children admitted for minor or intermediate surgery, were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to the ‘music-group’ (music intervention during awakening period) or to the ‘non-music group’ (standard postoperative medical care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), oxygen saturation (SpO2), glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of physiological response to stress and pain experience.

Results: 40 boys and two girls (6.7±4.1 years) were evaluated. No differences were found between ‘music’ group (n=21) or ‘no-music’ group (n=21) with respect to age, sex, weight, BMI. Music during awakening induced low increase of systolic and diastolic BP levels (P=0.09 and P=0.003 respectively). Preoperative cortisol levels were lower than at the end of surgical procedure (P=0.01) and at the awakening (P=0.06). A significant decrease at the awakening respect to the end of surgical procedure was found (P=0.02), without difference between the two groups (P=0.6). The ‘non-music’ group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in ‘music’ group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the behavioural FLACC scale.

Conclusions: Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia and perception of pain immediately after surgery in children. The relaxing effect seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in paediatric age.